New details highlight Lion Air jet's problems before crash

Published 11-02-2018

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JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) - New details about the crashed Lion Air's jet previous flight cast doubt on the Indonesian airline's claim to have fixed technical problems.

The plane plunged into the Java Sea early Monday, just minutes after taking off, killing all 189 people on board.

Herson, head of Bali-Nusa Tenggara Airport Authority, says the pilot on the Boeing 737 MAX 8's previous flight on Sunday requested to return to the airport not long after takeoff but then reported the problem was resolved.

The fatal flight's pilots also made a "return to base" request minutes before the crash.

Investigators displayed one of the jet's flight recorders at a news conference Thursday evening and said they would immediately attempt to upload information and begin analysis.

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Navy personnel show a personal document of a flight attendant recovered from the crashed Lion Air flight JT 610 found during a search operation for the victims in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


Navy divers continue recovery operations of the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


Navy personnel show the recovered flight data recorder of the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday on board of research ship Baruna Jaya in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


Navy divers prepare to dive as they conduct recovery operations on the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


Navy personnel gather around debris recovered from the sea where the Lion Air jet is believed to have crashed in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


A rescuer inspects personal belongings of passengers during the search operation of the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


A water-filled box contains the recovered flight data recorder of the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday on board of research ship Baruna Jaya in the waters of Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) - The Associated Press


The recovered flight data recorder of the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday is displayed during a press conference at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana) - The Associated Press


Rescuers carry a box containing the recovered flight data recorder of the Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea on Monday, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Divers recovered the crashed jet's flight data recorder from the seafloor on Thursday, a crucial development in the investigation into what caused the 2-month-old plane to plunge into Indonesian seas earlier this week, killing all of its passengers. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana) - The Associated Press